Sunnyvale
January 23, 2021, 6:05:00 PM
Saturday
Level 3

Mr. Rodney

Target 1​

Lesson Type:

Review

Measurment

:

Techniques and Formulas

Find the perimeter of a given shape.

Supporting targets:
1:

Define perimeter.

2:

Understand that perimeter is the distance around a figure.

3:

See a link between finding the perimeter of rectangles and multiplication.

4:

Understand that figures with the same perimeter can look different.

5:

Grade:

3rd

Vocabulary:

Perimeter, Length, Width, 2-Dimensions, Units

Activities:

-Accurately defined vocabulary using terms that are meaningful to them.

-Used formulas to calculate the perimeters or by counting unit lengths.

-Compared various figures with the same perimeter.

Home Exploration

Challenge Problem:
Challenge Data:

Guiding Questions:
Challenge Answer:

Target 2

Lesson Type:
Measurment
Techniques and Formulas
Measure area by counting full and half-unit squares.

:

Supporting targets:
1:

Relate area to arithmetic operations (multiplication and addition).

2:

Recognize area as a measurement of 2D shapes.

3:

4:

5:

Grade:

3rd

Vocabulary:

Area, Length, Width, Square Units, 2-Dimensions, 3-Dimensions, Volume, Cubic Units

Activities:

-Accurately defined vocabulary using terms that are meaningful to them.

-Reviewed that area is measured in square units.

-Given a specific area, use a foam square to stamp out 2 areas: 1 that is a rectangle (or square), and another in a shape of their choice.

-Used unifix blocks to build rectangular prisms and cubes.

-Applied their understanding of area and perimeter to 3D figures to determine its volume, LxWxH.

Home Exploration

Draw or stamp out (as we did in class) a rectangle or square. Using graph paper may also be helpful. Have your child determine the length and width, then calculate the area and perimeter, having them double check their own work until satisfied.

 

You could even explore larger spaces and find the area and perimeter of a rectangular objects such as picture frames, a table top, or even a room (rounding units to the nearest unit).

 

Build upon this concept and use a 3D object's HEIGHT into the mix to calculate its volume. Objects like snack or cereal boxes, thicker books, or even large blocks work well.

How do you find the area and perimeter of a shape?

What is the difference between 2D and 3D shapes?

What are the 3 dimensions you need to calculate a 3D figure's volume?

What kind of units should we use? Regular, square, or cubic units?

Challenge Problem:
Challenge Data:
Guiding Questions:
Challenge Answer:

Target 3

Lesson Type:

:

Supporting targets:
1:

2:

3:

4:

5:

Grade:

Vocabulary:

Activities:

Home Exploration

Challenge Problem:
Challenge Data:
Guiding Questions:
Challenge Answer: